Invited Colloquia Abstracts


Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB Lecture Theatre

An Invited Session in Memory of Tope (Sky) Omoniyi

Colloquium Chair: Bernard Spolsky (Bar-Ilan University)

Thursday, 3:30pm, OGGB Lecture Theatre

Advocacy in Language Policy

Colloquium Chairs: Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University) and Elana Shohamy (Tel Aviv University)  

Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB 307

Ethnographic Approaches to Space, Place, and Language

Colloquium Chair: Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

Friday, 3:30pm, Arts Lecture Theatre 5

Language, Art and Borderlands

Colloquium Chair: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB 5

New Speaker Identities

Colloquium Chairs: Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University) and Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

Thursday, 1:30pm, OGGB 5

Reclaiming Indigenous Languages—New Research and Praxis from the "Ground Up"

Colloquium Chairs: Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona) and Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)

Friday, 3:30pm, F&PAA LT

Rethinking multilingual language-in-education policies in the Asia Pacific Rim: A linguistic entrepreneurship perspective

Colloquium Chairs: Peter De Costa (Michigan State University); Joseph Park (National University of Singapore); Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)

Wednesday (Part 1), 3:30pm, OGGB 3

Thursday (Part 2), 3:30pm, OGGB 3

Sociolinguistics and Southern Theory – Voices, Questions and Alternatives

Colloquium Chair: Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)

Friday, 3:30pm, OGGB 5

Sociolinguistic Variation in the Pacific

Colloquium Chair: Miriam Meyerhoff (Victoria University of Wellington)



An Invited Session in Memory of Tope (Sky) Omoniyi

Colloquium Chair: Bernard Spolsky (Bar-Ilan University)

Abstract

The late Tope Omoniyi, whose sudden death prevented him presenting a plenary address at this conference, was widely known for his pioneering work with the late Joshua A. Fishman in the development of the study of the sociology of language and religion and in his contributions to the role of English in public health intervention in Africa. In this colloquium, some of his many followers and friends will pay tribute to his work and influence.

Authors

  1. Andrey Rosowsky  (University of Sheffield)
  2. Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew  (Nanyang Technological University)
  3. Ghil‘ad Zuckermann  (The University of Adelaide)
  4. Reema Alsaif  (La Trobe University)
  5. Donna Starks  (La Trobe University)
  6. Nirukshi Perera  (Monash University)
  7. Andreas Koechert (Universidad de Quintana Roo, Mexico)
  8. Barbara Pfeiler (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)
  9. Rajeshwari V. Pandharipande (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


Advocacy in Language Policy

Colloquium Chairs: Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University) and Elana Shohamy (Tel Aviv University)  
Discussant: Tim McNamara (The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Advocacy refers to types of acts or processes that aim at recommending, promoting and influencing policies to stakeholders in order to realize societal change. In language policy, advocacy groups attempt to influence education and social agendas such as adopting policies supporting refugees who fail in school content given their lack of proficiency in the new language, or adopt a new multilingual policy to expand the language repertoire. Various agents are involved in language policy advocacy such as researchers who promote applications of research findings to benefit students’  learning, NGOs, representatives of marginalized groups who seek more fair opportunities of immigrants for social participation. As to the processes of advocacy these include sharing research data, holding educational sessions, organizing meetings with practitioners and government agencies who can support changed policies.

In this invited symposium, using different models and frameworks of advocacy, we will report on five cases where researchers are engaged in advocacy activities targeting language policy issues. For each of the cases, the motivations, agency, acts of negotiations with various groups, and their impact will be described.  

But first an introduction paper will provide a brief survey of the role of advocacy groups in language policy in recent history. Paper two focuses on the challenges faced by speakers of small or indigenous languages, especially with regards to characters that are needed for these languages but are not recognized by international organizations that coordinate the global character set. The third paper reviews 15 years of NGO activities in a platform at Vienna university, focusing on conceptions of language rights that challenge traditional assumptions. The fourth paper discusses the implementation of a collaborative approach to policy analysis in the context of language requirements at universities. Paper five will discuss the complex dynamics of advocacy strategies towards altering monolingual policies and practices in Flemish schools. The sixth paper evaluates a series of advocacy strategies by language policy scholars that led to a proposal for a new multilingual language policy in Israeli schools.     

Authors

  1. Bernard Spolsky (Bar-IIan University)
  2. Iair G. Or (Tel Aviv University)
  3. Brigitta Busch (Universität Wien)
  4. Mi-Cha Flubacher (Universität Wien)
  5. Bart Deygers  (KULeuven, Centre for Language & Education)
  6. Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University)
  7. Stef Slembrouck  (Ghent University)
  8. Elana Shohamy ( Tel Aviv University)
  9. Michal Tannenbaum  (Tel Aviv University)
  10. Ofra-Lourie Inbar  (Tel Aviv University)


    Ethnographic Approaches to Space, Place, and Language

    Colloquium Chair: Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
    Colloquium Discussant: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

    Abstract

    The current era is marked by high degrees of mobility and deterritorialization alongside increased nationalism, disenfranchisement, and xenophobia. It is therefore increasingly important to understand how language functions as a means of expressing social relations with regard to place and space. In sociolinguistics, place has often been presented in a static fashion, with first and second wave sociolinguistics treating geographic places and social networks in places as explanations for language variation and change. These frameworks viewed variation in language as “incidental fallout from social space” (Eckert 2012, p. 94).

    This colloquium contributes to the third wave of sociolinguistic inquiry into space, place, and language by reversing the orientation. Rather than taking space and place for granted, this work treats social and geographic spaces, and identities associated with place, as the outcome of human activity and language practices (e.g., Agha, 2003; Johnstone, 2013). From this point of view, language is interpreted with a materialist perspective and is theorized as the nexus of human activity at the interstices of semiotic and material affordances and assemblages. Building on recent work in sociolinguistics that takes a spatial view of language (Blommaert, 2013; Jaworski & Thurlow, 2010; Pennycook & Otsuji, 2015), this colloquium considers language as part of the nexus of material and communicative activities that constitute social relations within social and geographic spaces. Key questions the colloquium papers investigate include: How does a spatial view of language expand present understandings of social relations, language and place? What are the semiotic, material, and linguistic components of place-making for people from different walks of life?  How are places and spaces contested through language practices? And, how do human activities, materialities, and language practices change over time to create new senses of place? Using ethnographic methods, the papers examine how space and place operate with regard to people's experience with novelty, nostalgia, belonging, marginality, and exclusion.

    Authors

    1. Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
    2. Maiko Ikeda (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
    3. Gavin Lamb (University of Hawaii)
    4. Jackie Jia Lou (Birkbeck, University of London)
    5. Gilles Baro (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg)


    Language, Art and Borderlands

    Colloquium Chair: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

    Abstract

    The colloquium takes its cue from Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s (1987) book title, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza . Anzaldúa, like many other writers and scholars, demonstrates that crossing borders may bring about an acute sense of one’s difference and otherness, which can be a source of weakness or of power. Artists have been crossing geographical, linguistic and symbolic borders for centuries. In the process, they have been appropriating and mixing different language codes, inventing novel scripts, words and forms of display, combining language with other modalities, and so on. Many have used language to index new, physical or mythical places, as well as lost, found and imaginary identities. The aim of this panel is to examine how the spatial, disciplinary, methodological, aesthetic and political borderlands are explored by visual artists through displayed language of inscriptions, citations, conversations, autonomous ‘language objects’, and so on.

    The colloquium includes seven papers that focus on: (1) the Austrian art brut artist August Walla’s ‘universal’ language that indexes his imaginary world as heterotopic (Busch); (2) the Hong Kong artist Wilson Shieh 石家豪 and his ‘documentary’ art compared and contrasted with a sociolinguistic dictionary project (Hutton); (3) semiotic trans/actions of the Chinese, New York-based artist Zhang Hongtu張宏圖 positioning his work across different symbolic, social and geographical spaces (Lee); (4) the British artist Jeremy Deller, who combines language, place and public space to re-imagine the present, past, familiar and remote social and political worlds (Monaghan); (5) a selection of contemporary Israeli artists, who use Hebrew to create a rich and heterogeneous visual language that cuts across cultural, political, religious and national fault lines at different scale levels (Tannenbaum); (6) contemporary Arabic calligraffiti artists, who dynamically reconfigure urban spaces and blur the boundary between art and activism (Panović); (7) ‘spectacular’ text-based pieces operating in the gap between aesthetics and politics (Jaworski). 

    Authors

    1. Brigitta Busch (University of Vienna)
    2. Christopher Hutton (University of Hong Kong)
    3. Tong King Lee (University of Hong Kong)
    4. Michal Tannenbaum (Tel Aviv University)
    5. Ivan Panovi ć (Nanyang Technological University)
    6. Adam Jaworski  (University of Hong Kong)


    New Speaker Identities

    Colloquium Chairs: Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University) and Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)  

    Abstract

    In line with the mobility of our contemporary globalized societies, sociolinguistics has been reconceptualized to take account of the multiplicity of languages, social groups, and urban communities of practice which now exists (e.g. Blommaert 2010; Martin-Jones, Blackledge & Creese 2012; Pennycook 1994, 2007). This has given a rise to new metadiscourses that query the fixed uniform categories used to conceptualize that language/identity relation, and which draw our attention to the in-between spaces brought about by this new sociolinguistic order, spaces which had often been ignored in previous linguistic and sociolinguistic discussion. There has been an explosion of terminology, concepts and labels to capture and describe these spaces and to examine the practices and identities of multilingual individuals. In this panel we will examine what the “new speaker” label has added to these lines of critique and their terminological explorations, building on other more familiar terms in circulation, including “emergent bilinguals” (García & Kleifgen 2010), “multilingual subjects” (Kramsch 2009) or, in applied linguistics, “learner identities”, “L2 users” (Norton 1995; Norton 2000; Pavlenko & Piller 2001; Pavlenko 2002)” or “second language identities” (Block 2007).

    Research on new speakers is a fairly recent phenomenon. It has its origins in European territorial minorities where traditional communities have been in decline but where new profiles of speakers have emerged in the context of language revitalization projects and policy interventions. Research on new speakers gathered momentum in the context of a European project on the theme of “New speakers in a multilingual Europe” (2013-2017). As part of this research agenda, there has been an attempt to query researchers in other areas such as the sociolinguistics of migration and “World Englishes” as a means of exploring the overlapping themes of identity, authenticity and linguistic ownership. This panel brings together sociolinguists from a range of backgrounds and foci, who have engaged with the new speaker concept in different ways and are using it as lens through which to understand what it means for individuals to ‘become’ speakers of language or languages that are not their first or national languages.

    Authors

    1. Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University)
    2. Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)
    3. Nicola Bermingham (University of Liverpool)
    4. Gwennan Higham (Swansea University)
    5. Santiago Sánchez Moreano (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – SeDyL-LABEX-EFL)
    6. Isabelle Léglise ( SeDyL, CNRS - French National Center for Scientific Research)
    7. Josep Soler (Stockholm University)
    8. Jonathan Kasstan (Queen Mary, University of London)
    9. Daan Hovens (Maastricht University)
    10. Stuart Dunmore (University of Edinburgh)
    11. Noel Ó Murchadha (Trinity College Dublin)
    12. Colin Flynn (Dublin City University)
    13. Mireia Trenchs-Parera (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
    14. Patricia Lamarre (Université de Montréal)



    Reclaiming Indigenous Languages—New Research and Praxis from the "Ground Up"

    Colloquium Chairs: Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona) and Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)
    Colloquium Discussant: Graham Smith (University of Waikato)

    Abstract

    This colloquium foregrounds new research and praxis in Indigenous-language reclamation from the “ground up” (Leonard & De Korne, 2017). Against a global pattern of massive development backed by militarism  “steamrolling over ecosystems and human cultures” (Hinton, 2013, p. xii), we highlight Indigenous resurgence movements to reclaim ancestral languages, strengthen cultural autonomy, and assert voice. We use Leonard’s notion of reclamation as “a larger effort by a community to claim its right to speak a language and to set associated goals in response to community needs and perspectives” (2012, p. 359). Reclamation highlights the decolonizing aims of contemporary language movements in the continuance of languages, lands, and life-ways. We begin with a 10-minute introduction, followed by two counterpoised paper presentations and a synthetic discussant commentary. In the first paper Prem Phyak explores an “engaged language policy movement” undertaken by and with Limbu youth in Nepal. Central to this language reclamation movement is a process of consciousness-raising, “awakening a sense of injustice” (Deutsch, 1973) that arouses justice-oriented language reclamation praxis.  The second paper adapts Archibald’s (2008) concept of storywork—experiential narratives that constitute an epistemic, theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological framework—to explore language reclamation movements in Native America. Using multimedia, the authors present five narrative accounts of language reclamation: Chickasaw. Mojave, Miami, Hopi, and Mohawk. Relating individual and communal reclamation journeys, this work demonstrates the significance of stories as empirically grounded cultural resources for recovering and sustaining Indigenous languages, knowledges, and identities. The session concludes with discussant commentary by Māori scholar-activist Graham Smith and time for dialogue and interaction with audience participants.

    Authors 

    1. Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona)
    2. Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)
    3. Prem Phyak , (Tribhuvan University)
    4. Kari Chew (University of Arizona)
    5. Natalie Diaz (Arizona State University)
    6. Wesley Leonard (University of California-Riverside)
    7. Louellyn White (Concordia University)


    Rethinking multilingual language-in-education policies in the Asia Pacific Rim: A linguistic entrepreneurship perspective

    Colloquium Chairs: Peter De Costa (Michigan State University); Joseph Park (National University of Singapore) and Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)  

    Abstract

    This panel invokes the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship (De Costa, Wee & Park, 2016) to critique how actors are encouraged to brand themselves as neoliberal subjects in order to maximize their potential on the global stage. In light of this sociolinguistic and material reality, the three-hour colloquium brings together international language policy scholars who examine how countries in the Asia-Pacific region are actively reconfiguring their language-in-education policies to keep abreast with rapid changes in society. The first three papers explore ways in which the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship applies to the educational contexts of Singapore, South Korea, and the Philippines, respectively. The next three papers respond to the three initial papers and at the same time comment on how the construct of linguistic entrepreneurship can be applied in conjunction with related constructs in language policy research.

    Paper 1 frames the key issues underlying the neoliberal turn in language-in-education policies in the Asia-Pacific Rim.

    Paper 2 examines how Mandarin language enrichment centers in Singapore share a discourse of Mandarin learning as character-building struggle, in which the struggle is a source of self-improvement.

    Paper 3 discusses how the South Korean government mobilizes the bilingual resources of marriage migrants as it attempts to transform these migrants into bilingual teachers for nationalistic purposes.

    Focusing on Mindanao, in the Philippines, Paper 4 investigates how neocolonialism facilitates the deepening instrumentalization of language and neoliberal subjectification of individuals.

    Problematizing the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship, Paper 5 maintains that what is actually valued in transnational contexts is communicative entrepreneurship. The paper also calls for an examination of who benefits and who suffers from economic gaps.

    Underscoring how the role of individuals has been under-appreciated, Paper 6 posits that three broad power/authorizations, which generate registers of intervention in language policy praxis, are linked to four kinds of participants who typically generate language change in these power/authority ‘containers’. 

    Paper 7 responds to the panel through the lens of (dis)citizenship, asking how linguistic entrepreneurship links economic and political forms of inequality, and what forms of moral and social order it reproduces or introduces.

    Authors

    1. Peter De Costa (Michigan State University)
    2. Joseph Park (National University of Singapore)
    3. Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)
    4. Rebecca Starr (National University of Singapore)
    5. Shrutika Kapoor (National University of Singapore)
    6. Bong-gi Sohn (University of British Columbia)
    7. Mi Ok Kang (Utah Valley University)
    8. Ruanni Tupas (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University)
    9. Ryuko Kubota (University of British Columbia)
    10. Joseph Lo Bianco (University of Melbourne)
    11. Monica Heller (University of Toronto)

     


    Sociolinguistics and Southern Theory – Voices, Questions and Alternatives

    Colloquium Chair: Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)
    Colloquium Discussant: Crispin Thurlow (University of Bern)

    Abstract

    Sociolinguistics emerged as a named field of inquiry in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. Its antecedents include the early tradition of linguistic anthropology in the United States as well as diverse strands of European scholarship: the surveys by German and French dialectologists, the studies of philologists interested in language contact, the language-philosophical work of scholars in eastern Europe (especially Russia), and the functionalist approaches that were developed in England. What is absent from the canon is scholarship that emerged outside of Euro-America, especially in the global South, that is, those parts of the world that have been the object of European colonialism since the fifteenth century, and that constitute the so-called ‘majority world’.

    It is the purpose of this panel to explore sociolinguistic theory-building from a decidedly Southern, that is, decolonial-postcolonial perspective. Thus, the global South – the postcolonial world of Africa, South America and Asia – is not simply a site for data collection by Northern scholars, but an intellectual space where existing (Euro-American) theories are critiqued and new theories are formulated. In addressing the idea of Southern theory, and its impact on sociolinguistic theorizing, participants are invited to reflect critically on the following questions: What would a distinctively Southern approach look like (and how does it differ from, and interact with, other approaches such as Black Studies, Feminism, Queer Studies, radical anti-capitalist thought, etc.)? Who are the theorists that Southern scholars draw on in formulating their ideas about the social life of language? What kind of dialogue can we imagine between Southern and Northern scholars and knowledges? Do North and South stand in a relationship of duality, of dialectic or of hybridity? What contribution can Southern theory make to the study of language and communication (including questions of methodology and epistemology)? What is the role of resistance, disruption and ‘disciplinary disobedience’ in the broader project of Southern theories? And how does all this affect sociolinguistic practice (and the ways in which we teach the history of our field)?

    Authors

      1. Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)
      2. Alan Carneiro (University of Cape Town)
      3. Daniel Silva (UFSC)
      4. Pamela Maseko  (University of the Western Cape; Rhodes University)
      5. Pia Lane  (University of Oslo)
      6. Alastair Pennycook  (University of Technology Sydney)
      7. Anne Storch (University of Cologne)
      8. Sinfree Makoni (Penn State)
      9. Marcelyn Oostendorp  (Stellenbosch University)


    Sociolinguistic Variation in the Pacific

    Colloquium Chair: Miriam Meyerhoff (Victoria University of Wellington)

    Abstract

    The Pacific remains a linguistically and sociolinguistically under-studied region, particularly from the point of view of language variation and change. The seven papers in this colloquium provide varied perspectives on variation in the Pacific, with a focus on the indigenous, non-colonial languages. This makes the colloquium unique in variationist sociolinguistics. The papers highlight the intersection between variationist sociolinguistics and contact linguistics, psycholinguistics, demography, typology and historical linguistics.

    Authors

    1. Miriam Meyerhoff  (Victoria University of Wellington)
    2. Eri Kashima (Australian National University)
    3. Marie Duhamel (Australian National University)
    4. Anne-Laure Dotte (University of New Caledonia)
    5. Brooke Ross (Victoria University of Wellington)
    6. Elaine Ballard (University of Auckland)
    7. Helen Charters (University of Auckland)
    8. Catherine Watson (The University of Auckland)
    9. Isabelle Buchstaller (University of Duisburg-Essen)
    10. Wilfred Fimone (University of the South Pacific)

     


    BACK TO TOP

    Invited Colloquia Abstracts

    Title

    Chair

    Wednesday

    3:30pm

    OGGB Lecture Theatre

    Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB Lecture Theatre

    An Invited Session in Memory of Tope (Sky) Omoniyi

    Colloquium Chair: Bernard Spolsky (Bar-Ilan University)

    Thursday

    3:30pm

    OGGB Lecture Theatre

    Thursday, 3:30pm, OGGB Lecture Theatre

    Advocacy in Language Policy

    Colloquium Chairs: Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University) and Elana Shohamy (Tel Aviv University)  

    Wednesday

    3:30pm

    OGGB 307

    Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB 307

    Ethnographic Approaches to Space, Place, and Language

    Colloquium Chair: Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

    Friday

    3:30pm

    Arts Lecture Theatre 5

    Friday, 3:30pm, Arts Lecture Theatre 5

    Language, Art and Borderlands

    Colloquium Chair: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

    Wednesday

    3:30pm

    OGGB 5

    Wednesday, 3:30pm, OGGB 5

    New Speaker Identities

    Colloquium Chairs: Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University) and Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

    Thursday

    1:30pm

    OGGB 5

    Thursday, 1:30pm, OGGB 5

    Reclaiming Indigenous Languages—New Research and Praxis from the "Ground Up"

    Colloquium Chairs: Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona) and Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)

    Friday

    3:30pm

    F&PAA LT

    Friday, 3:30pm, F&PAA LT

    Rethinking multilingual language-in-education policies in the Asia Pacific Rim: A linguistic entrepreneurship perspective

    Colloquium Chairs: Peter De Costa (Michigan State University); Joseph Park (National University of Singapore); Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)

    Wednesday -Part 1

    Thursday -Part2

    3:30pm

    3:30pm

    OGGB 3

    OGGB 3

    Wednesday (Part 1), 3:30pm, OGGB 3

    Thursday (Part 2), 3:30pm, OGGB 3

    Sociolinguistics and Southern Theory – Voices, Questions and Alternatives

    Colloquium Chair: Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)

    Friday

    3:30pm

    OGGB 5

    Friday, 3:30pm, OGGB 5

    Sociolinguistic Variation in the Pacific

    Colloquium Chair: Miriam Meyerhoff (Victoria University of Wellington)



    An Invited Session in Memory of Tope (Sky) Omoniyi

    Colloquium Chair: Bernard Spolsky (Bar-Ilan University)

    Abstract

    The late Tope Omoniyi, whose sudden death prevented him presenting a plenary address at this conference, was widely known for his pioneering work with the late Joshua A. Fishman in the development of the study of the sociology of language and religion and in his contributions to the role of English in public health intervention in Africa. In this colloquium, some of his many followers and friends will pay tribute to his work and influence.

    Authors

    1. Andrey Rosowsky  (University of Sheffield)
    2. Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew  (Nanyang Technological University)
    3. Ghil‘ad Zuckermann  (The University of Adelaide)
    4. Reema Alsaif  (La Trobe University)
    5. Donna Starks  (La Trobe University)
    6. Nirukshi Perera  (Monash University)
    7. Andreas Koechert (Universidad de Quintana Roo, Mexico)
    8. Barbara Pfeiler (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)
    9. Rajeshwari V. Pandharipande (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


    Advocacy in Language Policy

    Colloquium Chairs: Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University) and Elana Shohamy (Tel Aviv University)  
    Discussant: Tim McNamara (The University of Melbourne)

    Abstract

    Advocacy refers to types of acts or processes that aim at recommending, promoting and influencing policies to stakeholders in order to realize societal change. In language policy, advocacy groups attempt to influence education and social agendas such as adopting policies supporting refugees who fail in school content given their lack of proficiency in the new language, or adopt a new multilingual policy to expand the language repertoire. Various agents are involved in language policy advocacy such as researchers who promote applications of research findings to benefit students’  learning, NGOs, representatives of marginalized groups who seek more fair opportunities of immigrants for social participation. As to the processes of advocacy these include sharing research data, holding educational sessions, organizing meetings with practitioners and government agencies who can support changed policies.

    In this invited symposium, using different models and frameworks of advocacy, we will report on five cases where researchers are engaged in advocacy activities targeting language policy issues. For each of the cases, the motivations, agency, acts of negotiations with various groups, and their impact will be described.  

    But first an introduction paper will provide a brief survey of the role of advocacy groups in language policy in recent history. Paper two focuses on the challenges faced by speakers of small or indigenous languages, especially with regards to characters that are needed for these languages but are not recognized by international organizations that coordinate the global character set. The third paper reviews 15 years of NGO activities in a platform at Vienna university, focusing on conceptions of language rights that challenge traditional assumptions. The fourth paper discusses the implementation of a collaborative approach to policy analysis in the context of language requirements at universities. Paper five will discuss the complex dynamics of advocacy strategies towards altering monolingual policies and practices in Flemish schools. The sixth paper evaluates a series of advocacy strategies by language policy scholars that led to a proposal for a new multilingual language policy in Israeli schools.     

    Authors

    1. Bernard Spolsky (Bar-IIan University)
    2. Iair G. Or (Tel Aviv University)
    3. Brigitta Busch (Universität Wien)
    4. Mi-Cha Flubacher (Universität Wien)
    5. Bart Deygers  (KULeuven, Centre for Language & Education)
    6. Piet Van Avermaet (Ghent University)
    7. Stef Slembrouck  (Ghent University)
    8. Elana Shohamy ( Tel Aviv University)
    9. Michal Tannenbaum  (Tel Aviv University)
    10. Ofra-Lourie Inbar  (Tel Aviv University)


      Ethnographic Approaches to Space, Place, and Language

      Colloquium Chair: Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      Colloquium Discussant: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

      Abstract

      The current era is marked by high degrees of mobility and deterritorialization alongside increased nationalism, disenfranchisement, and xenophobia. It is therefore increasingly important to understand how language functions as a means of expressing social relations with regard to place and space. In sociolinguistics, place has often been presented in a static fashion, with first and second wave sociolinguistics treating geographic places and social networks in places as explanations for language variation and change. These frameworks viewed variation in language as “incidental fallout from social space” (Eckert 2012, p. 94).

      This colloquium contributes to the third wave of sociolinguistic inquiry into space, place, and language by reversing the orientation. Rather than taking space and place for granted, this work treats social and geographic spaces, and identities associated with place, as the outcome of human activity and language practices (e.g., Agha, 2003; Johnstone, 2013). From this point of view, language is interpreted with a materialist perspective and is theorized as the nexus of human activity at the interstices of semiotic and material affordances and assemblages. Building on recent work in sociolinguistics that takes a spatial view of language (Blommaert, 2013; Jaworski & Thurlow, 2010; Pennycook & Otsuji, 2015), this colloquium considers language as part of the nexus of material and communicative activities that constitute social relations within social and geographic spaces. Key questions the colloquium papers investigate include: How does a spatial view of language expand present understandings of social relations, language and place? What are the semiotic, material, and linguistic components of place-making for people from different walks of life?  How are places and spaces contested through language practices? And, how do human activities, materialities, and language practices change over time to create new senses of place? Using ethnographic methods, the papers examine how space and place operate with regard to people's experience with novelty, nostalgia, belonging, marginality, and exclusion.

      Authors

      1. Christina Higgins (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      2. Maiko Ikeda (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      3. Gavin Lamb (University of Hawaii)
      4. Jackie Jia Lou (Birkbeck, University of London)
      5. Gilles Baro (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg)


      Language, Art and Borderlands

      Colloquium Chair: Adam Jaworski (University of Hong Kong)

      Abstract

      The colloquium takes its cue from Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s (1987) book title, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza . Anzaldúa, like many other writers and scholars, demonstrates that crossing borders may bring about an acute sense of one’s difference and otherness, which can be a source of weakness or of power. Artists have been crossing geographical, linguistic and symbolic borders for centuries. In the process, they have been appropriating and mixing different language codes, inventing novel scripts, words and forms of display, combining language with other modalities, and so on. Many have used language to index new, physical or mythical places, as well as lost, found and imaginary identities. The aim of this panel is to examine how the spatial, disciplinary, methodological, aesthetic and political borderlands are explored by visual artists through displayed language of inscriptions, citations, conversations, autonomous ‘language objects’, and so on.

      The colloquium includes seven papers that focus on: (1) the Austrian art brut artist August Walla’s ‘universal’ language that indexes his imaginary world as heterotopic (Busch); (2) the Hong Kong artist Wilson Shieh 石家豪 and his ‘documentary’ art compared and contrasted with a sociolinguistic dictionary project (Hutton); (3) semiotic trans/actions of the Chinese, New York-based artist Zhang Hongtu張宏圖 positioning his work across different symbolic, social and geographical spaces (Lee); (4) the British artist Jeremy Deller, who combines language, place and public space to re-imagine the present, past, familiar and remote social and political worlds (Monaghan); (5) a selection of contemporary Israeli artists, who use Hebrew to create a rich and heterogeneous visual language that cuts across cultural, political, religious and national fault lines at different scale levels (Tannenbaum); (6) contemporary Arabic calligraffiti artists, who dynamically reconfigure urban spaces and blur the boundary between art and activism (Panović); (7) ‘spectacular’ text-based pieces operating in the gap between aesthetics and politics (Jaworski). 

      Authors

      1. Brigitta Busch (University of Vienna)
      2. Christopher Hutton (University of Hong Kong)
      3. Tong King Lee (University of Hong Kong)
      4. Michal Tannenbaum (Tel Aviv University)
      5. Ivan Panovi ć (Nanyang Technological University)
      6. Adam Jaworski  (University of Hong Kong)


      New Speaker Identities

      Colloquium Chairs: Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University) and Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)  

      Abstract

      In line with the mobility of our contemporary globalized societies, sociolinguistics has been reconceptualized to take account of the multiplicity of languages, social groups, and urban communities of practice which now exists (e.g. Blommaert 2010; Martin-Jones, Blackledge & Creese 2012; Pennycook 1994, 2007). This has given a rise to new metadiscourses that query the fixed uniform categories used to conceptualize that language/identity relation, and which draw our attention to the in-between spaces brought about by this new sociolinguistic order, spaces which had often been ignored in previous linguistic and sociolinguistic discussion. There has been an explosion of terminology, concepts and labels to capture and describe these spaces and to examine the practices and identities of multilingual individuals. In this panel we will examine what the “new speaker” label has added to these lines of critique and their terminological explorations, building on other more familiar terms in circulation, including “emergent bilinguals” (García & Kleifgen 2010), “multilingual subjects” (Kramsch 2009) or, in applied linguistics, “learner identities”, “L2 users” (Norton 1995; Norton 2000; Pavlenko & Piller 2001; Pavlenko 2002)” or “second language identities” (Block 2007).

      Research on new speakers is a fairly recent phenomenon. It has its origins in European territorial minorities where traditional communities have been in decline but where new profiles of speakers have emerged in the context of language revitalization projects and policy interventions. Research on new speakers gathered momentum in the context of a European project on the theme of “New speakers in a multilingual Europe” (2013-2017). As part of this research agenda, there has been an attempt to query researchers in other areas such as the sociolinguistics of migration and “World Englishes” as a means of exploring the overlapping themes of identity, authenticity and linguistic ownership. This panel brings together sociolinguists from a range of backgrounds and foci, who have engaged with the new speaker concept in different ways and are using it as lens through which to understand what it means for individuals to ‘become’ speakers of language or languages that are not their first or national languages.

      Authors

      1. Bernadette O'Rourke (Heriot-Watt University)
      2. Joan Pujolar (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)
      3. Nicola Bermingham (University of Liverpool)
      4. Gwennan Higham (Swansea University)
      5. Santiago Sánchez Moreano (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – SeDyL-LABEX-EFL)
      6. Isabelle Léglise ( SeDyL, CNRS - French National Center for Scientific Research)
      7. Josep Soler (Stockholm University)
      8. Jonathan Kasstan (Queen Mary, University of London)
      9. Daan Hovens (Maastricht University)
      10. Stuart Dunmore (University of Edinburgh)
      11. Noel Ó Murchadha (Trinity College Dublin)
      12. Colin Flynn (Dublin City University)
      13. Mireia Trenchs-Parera (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
      14. Patricia Lamarre (Université de Montréal)



      Reclaiming Indigenous Languages—New Research and Praxis from the "Ground Up"

      Colloquium Chairs: Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona) and Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)
      Colloquium Discussant: Graham Smith (University of Waikato)

      Abstract

      This colloquium foregrounds new research and praxis in Indigenous-language reclamation from the “ground up” (Leonard & De Korne, 2017). Against a global pattern of massive development backed by militarism  “steamrolling over ecosystems and human cultures” (Hinton, 2013, p. xii), we highlight Indigenous resurgence movements to reclaim ancestral languages, strengthen cultural autonomy, and assert voice. We use Leonard’s notion of reclamation as “a larger effort by a community to claim its right to speak a language and to set associated goals in response to community needs and perspectives” (2012, p. 359). Reclamation highlights the decolonizing aims of contemporary language movements in the continuance of languages, lands, and life-ways. We begin with a 10-minute introduction, followed by two counterpoised paper presentations and a synthetic discussant commentary. In the first paper Prem Phyak explores an “engaged language policy movement” undertaken by and with Limbu youth in Nepal. Central to this language reclamation movement is a process of consciousness-raising, “awakening a sense of injustice” (Deutsch, 1973) that arouses justice-oriented language reclamation praxis.  The second paper adapts Archibald’s (2008) concept of storywork—experiential narratives that constitute an epistemic, theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological framework—to explore language reclamation movements in Native America. Using multimedia, the authors present five narrative accounts of language reclamation: Chickasaw. Mojave, Miami, Hopi, and Mohawk. Relating individual and communal reclamation journeys, this work demonstrates the significance of stories as empirically grounded cultural resources for recovering and sustaining Indigenous languages, knowledges, and identities. The session concludes with discussant commentary by Māori scholar-activist Graham Smith and time for dialogue and interaction with audience participants.

      Authors 

      1. Sheilah Nicholas (University of Arizona)
      2. Teresa McCarty (University of California-Los Angeles)
      3. Prem Phyak , (Tribhuvan University)
      4. Kari Chew (University of Arizona)
      5. Natalie Diaz (Arizona State University)
      6. Wesley Leonard (University of California-Riverside)
      7. Louellyn White (Concordia University)


      Rethinking multilingual language-in-education policies in the Asia Pacific Rim: A linguistic entrepreneurship perspective

      Colloquium Chairs: Peter De Costa (Michigan State University); Joseph Park (National University of Singapore) and Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)  

      Abstract

      This panel invokes the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship (De Costa, Wee & Park, 2016) to critique how actors are encouraged to brand themselves as neoliberal subjects in order to maximize their potential on the global stage. In light of this sociolinguistic and material reality, the three-hour colloquium brings together international language policy scholars who examine how countries in the Asia-Pacific region are actively reconfiguring their language-in-education policies to keep abreast with rapid changes in society. The first three papers explore ways in which the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship applies to the educational contexts of Singapore, South Korea, and the Philippines, respectively. The next three papers respond to the three initial papers and at the same time comment on how the construct of linguistic entrepreneurship can be applied in conjunction with related constructs in language policy research.

      Paper 1 frames the key issues underlying the neoliberal turn in language-in-education policies in the Asia-Pacific Rim.

      Paper 2 examines how Mandarin language enrichment centers in Singapore share a discourse of Mandarin learning as character-building struggle, in which the struggle is a source of self-improvement.

      Paper 3 discusses how the South Korean government mobilizes the bilingual resources of marriage migrants as it attempts to transform these migrants into bilingual teachers for nationalistic purposes.

      Focusing on Mindanao, in the Philippines, Paper 4 investigates how neocolonialism facilitates the deepening instrumentalization of language and neoliberal subjectification of individuals.

      Problematizing the notion of linguistic entrepreneurship, Paper 5 maintains that what is actually valued in transnational contexts is communicative entrepreneurship. The paper also calls for an examination of who benefits and who suffers from economic gaps.

      Underscoring how the role of individuals has been under-appreciated, Paper 6 posits that three broad power/authorizations, which generate registers of intervention in language policy praxis, are linked to four kinds of participants who typically generate language change in these power/authority ‘containers’. 

      Paper 7 responds to the panel through the lens of (dis)citizenship, asking how linguistic entrepreneurship links economic and political forms of inequality, and what forms of moral and social order it reproduces or introduces.

      Authors

      1. Peter De Costa (Michigan State University)
      2. Joseph Park (National University of Singapore)
      3. Lionel Wee (National University of Singapore)
      4. Rebecca Starr (National University of Singapore)
      5. Shrutika Kapoor (National University of Singapore)
      6. Bong-gi Sohn (University of British Columbia)
      7. Mi Ok Kang (Utah Valley University)
      8. Ruanni Tupas (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University)
      9. Ryuko Kubota (University of British Columbia)
      10. Joseph Lo Bianco (University of Melbourne)
      11. Monica Heller (University of Toronto)

       


      Sociolinguistics and Southern Theory – Voices, Questions and Alternatives

      Colloquium Chair: Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)
      Colloquium Discussant: Crispin Thurlow (University of Bern)

      Abstract

      Sociolinguistics emerged as a named field of inquiry in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. Its antecedents include the early tradition of linguistic anthropology in the United States as well as diverse strands of European scholarship: the surveys by German and French dialectologists, the studies of philologists interested in language contact, the language-philosophical work of scholars in eastern Europe (especially Russia), and the functionalist approaches that were developed in England. What is absent from the canon is scholarship that emerged outside of Euro-America, especially in the global South, that is, those parts of the world that have been the object of European colonialism since the fifteenth century, and that constitute the so-called ‘majority world’.

      It is the purpose of this panel to explore sociolinguistic theory-building from a decidedly Southern, that is, decolonial-postcolonial perspective. Thus, the global South – the postcolonial world of Africa, South America and Asia – is not simply a site for data collection by Northern scholars, but an intellectual space where existing (Euro-American) theories are critiqued and new theories are formulated. In addressing the idea of Southern theory, and its impact on sociolinguistic theorizing, participants are invited to reflect critically on the following questions: What would a distinctively Southern approach look like (and how does it differ from, and interact with, other approaches such as Black Studies, Feminism, Queer Studies, radical anti-capitalist thought, etc.)? Who are the theorists that Southern scholars draw on in formulating their ideas about the social life of language? What kind of dialogue can we imagine between Southern and Northern scholars and knowledges? Do North and South stand in a relationship of duality, of dialectic or of hybridity? What contribution can Southern theory make to the study of language and communication (including questions of methodology and epistemology)? What is the role of resistance, disruption and ‘disciplinary disobedience’ in the broader project of Southern theories? And how does all this affect sociolinguistic practice (and the ways in which we teach the history of our field)?

      Authors

        1. Ana Deumert (University of Cape Town)
        2. Alan Carneiro (University of Cape Town)
        3. Daniel Silva (UFSC)
        4. Pamela Maseko  (University of the Western Cape; Rhodes University)
        5. Pia Lane  (University of Oslo)
        6. Alastair Pennycook  (University of Technology Sydney)
        7. Anne Storch (University of Cologne)
        8. Sinfree Makoni (Penn State)
        9. Marcelyn Oostendorp  (Stellenbosch University)


      Sociolinguistic Variation in the Pacific

      Colloquium Chair: Miriam Meyerhoff (Victoria University of Wellington)

      Abstract

      The Pacific remains a linguistically and sociolinguistically under-studied region, particularly from the point of view of language variation and change. The seven papers in this colloquium provide varied perspectives on variation in the Pacific, with a focus on the indigenous, non-colonial languages. This makes the colloquium unique in variationist sociolinguistics. The papers highlight the intersection between variationist sociolinguistics and contact linguistics, psycholinguistics, demography, typology and historical linguistics.

      Authors

      1. Miriam Meyerhoff  (Victoria University of Wellington)
      2. Eri Kashima (Australian National University)
      3. Marie Duhamel (Australian National University)
      4. Anne-Laure Dotte (University of New Caledonia)
      5. Brooke Ross (Victoria University of Wellington)
      6. Elaine Ballard (University of Auckland)
      7. Helen Charters (University of Auckland)
      8. Catherine Watson (The University of Auckland)
      9. Isabelle Buchstaller (University of Duisburg-Essen)
      10. Wilfred Fimone (University of the South Pacific)

       


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